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Common errors in English usage - misspelled words list - daily 10 words - Part 23


MIGHT HAS WELL/MIGHT AS WELL

You might as well get this one right: the expression is not "might has
well" but "might as well."

NEXT STORE/NEXT DOOR

You can adore the boy next door, but not "next store."

POLE/POLL

A pole is a long stick. You could take a "poll" (survey or ballot) to
determine whether voters want lower taxes or better education.

REVELANT/RELEVANT

"Revelant" is both spoken and written frequently when "relevant" is
intended. The same is true of "revelance," a misspelling of "relevance."

SO FUN/SO MUCH FUN

Strictly a young person's usage: "That party was so fun!" If you don't
want to be perceived as a gum-chewing airhead, say "so much fun."

TODAY'S DAY AND AGE/THIS DAY AND AGE

The traditional expression is "in this day and age," meaning "right at
this moment and during a considerable stretch of time around this
moment." "Today's day" is redundant: "today" already has "day" in it.

WERE/WHERE

Sloppy typists frequently leave the "H" out of "where." Spelling
checkers do not catch this sort of error, of course, so look for it as
you proofread.

CONTRASTS/CONTRASTS WITH
"With" must not be omitted in sentences like this: "Julia's enthusiasm
for rugby contrasts with Cheryl's devotion to chess."

ALL OF THE SUDDEN/ALL OF A SUDDEN
An unexpected event happens not "all of the sudden" but "all of a
sudden."

DOMINATE/DOMINANT

The verb is "dominate"; the adjective is "dominant." The dominant
chimpanzee tends to dominate the others.





Common errors in English usage - misspelled words list - daily 10 words - Part 23 Reviewed by Nancy Tamil on 7:00:00 PM Rating: 5

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