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Common errors in English usage - misspelled words list - daily 10 words - Part 20


ALL READY/ALREADY

 "All ready" is a phrase meaning "completely prepared," as in "As soon as
I put my coat on, I'll be all ready." "Already," however, is an adverb
used to describe something that has happened before a certain time, as
in "What do you mean you'd rather stay home? I've already got my coat
on."


BONAFIED/BONA FIDE

"Bona fide" is a Latin phrase meaning "in good faith," most often used
to mean "genuine" today. It is often misspelled as if it were the past
tense of an imaginary verb: "bonafy."

CD-ROM disk/CD-ROM

"CD-ROM" stands for "compact disc, read-only memory," so adding another
"disc" or "disk" is redundant. The same goes for "DVD" (from Digital
Video Disc" or "Digital Versatile Disc"--there are non-video versions).
Don't say "give me that DVD disk," just "give me that DVD."

DOVE/DIVED

Although "dove" is a common form of the past tense of "dive," a few
authorities consider "dived" preferable in formal writing.

EXACT SAME/EXACTLY THE SAME

In casual speech we often say things like, "The fruitcake he gave me was
the exact same one I'd given him last Christmas," but in formal English
the phrase is "exactly the same."

FORMALLY/FORMERLY

These two are often mixed up in speech. If you are doing something in a
formal manner, you are behaving formally; but if you previously behaved
differently, you did so formerly.


GENIUS/BRILLIANT

In standard English "genius" is a noun, but not an adjective. In slang,
people often say things like "Telling Mom your English teacher is
requiring the class to get HBO was genius!" The standard way to say this
is "was brilliant."

HOW TO/HOW CAN I

You can ask someone how to publish a novel, but when you do, don't write
"How to publish a novel?" Instead ask "How can I publish a novel?" or
"How does someone publish a novel?" If you're in luck, the person you've
asked will tell you how to do it. "How to" belongs in statements, not
questions.

IN THE MIST/IN THE MIDST

When you are surrounded by something, you're in the midst of it--its
middle. If you're in a mist, you're just in a fog.

LENSE/LENS

Although the variant spelling "lense" is listed in some dictionaries,
the standard spelling for those little disks that focus light is "lens."





Common errors in English usage - misspelled words list - daily 10 words - Part 20 Reviewed by Nancy Tamil on 8:02:00 PM Rating: 5

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