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Shares, Bonds, Debentures, capital market, money market -- defnititons


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/definition/shares

 SHARES
The capital of a company is divided into shares. Each share forms a unit of ownership and is offered for sale so as to raise capital for the company.

Definition: The capital of a company is divided into shares. Each share forms a unit of ownership of a company and is offered for sale so as to raise capital for the company.

Description: Shares can be broadly divided into two categories - equity and preference shares. Equity shares give their holders the power to share the earnings/profits in the company as well as a vote in the AGMs of the company. Such a shareholder has to share the profits and also bear the losses incurred by the company.

On the other hand, preference shares earn their holders only dividends, which are fixed, giving no voting rights. Equity shareholders are regarded as the real owners of the company. When the shares are offered for sale directly by the company for the first time, they are offered in the primary market, whereas the trading of shares takes place in the secondary market.

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/bond.asp

DEFINITION OF 'BOND'
debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity (corporate or governmental) that borrows the funds for a defined period of time at a fixed interest rate. Bonds are used by companies, municipalities, states and U.S. and foreign governments to finance a variety of projects and activities.
Bonds are commonly referred to as fixed-income securities and are one of the three main asset classes, along with stocks and cash equivalents.
INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'BOND'
The indebted entity (issuer) issues a bond that states the interest rate (coupon) that will be paid and when the loaned funds (bond principal) are to be returned (maturity date). Interest on bonds is usually paid every six months (semi-annually). The main categories of bonds are corporate bondsmunicipal bonds, and U.S. Treasury bonds, notes and bills, which are collectively referred to as simply "Treasuries."
Two features of a bond - credit quality and duration - are the principal determinants of a bond's interest rate. Bond maturities range from a 90-day Treasury bill to a 30-year government bond. Corporate and municipals are typically in the three to 10-year range.
5 Basic Things To Know About Bonds
By Eric FontinelleAAA | 
Want to improve your portfolio's risk/return profile? Adding bonds creates a more balanced portfolio, strengthening diversification and calming volatility. You can get your start in bond investing by learning a few basic bond market terms.
On the surface, the bond market may seem unfamiliar, even to experienced stock investors. Many investors make only passing ventures into bonds because they are confused by the apparent complexity of the market. Bonds are actually very simple debt instruments, if you understand the terminology. Let's take a look at that terminology now.
TutorialBond Basics

1. Basic Bond Characteristics
A bond is simply a type of loan taken out by companies. Investors lend a company money when they buy its bonds. In exchange, the company pays an interest "coupon" at predetermined intervals (usually annually or semiannually) and returns the principal on the maturity date, ending the loan.

Unlike stocks, bonds can vary significantly based on the terms of the bond'sindenture, a legal document outlining the characteristics of the bond. Because each bond issue is different, it is important to understand the precise terms before investing. In particular, there are six important features to look for when considering a bond.
Maturity
The maturity date of a bond is the date when the principal, or par, amount of the bond will be paid to investors, and the company's bond obligation will end.
Secured/Unsecured
A bond can be secured or unsecured. Unsecured bonds are called debentures; their interest payments and return of principal are guaranteed only by the credit of the issuing company. If the company fails, you may get little of your investment back. On the other hand, a secured bond is a bond in which specific assets are pledged to bondholders if the company cannot repay the obligation.
Liquidation Preference
When a firm goes bankrupt, it pays money back to investors in a particular order as it liquidates. After a firm has sold off all of its assets, it begins to pay out to investors. Senior debt is paid first, then junior (subordinated) debt, and stockholders get whatever is left over. (To learn more, read An Overview of Corporate Bankruptcy.)

Coupon
The coupon amount is the amount of interest paid to bondholders, normally on an annual or semiannual basis.
Tax Status
While the majority of corporate bonds are taxable investments, there are some government and municipal bonds that are tax exempt, meaning that income and capital gains realized on the bonds are not subject to the usual state and federal taxation. (To learn more, read The Basics of Municipal Bonds.)
Because investors do not have to pay taxes on returns, tax-exempt bonds will have lower interest than equivalent taxable bonds. An investor must calculate the tax-equivalent yield to compare the return with that of taxable instruments.
Callability
Some bonds can be paid off by an issuer before maturity. If a bond has a call provision, it may be paid off at earlier dates, at the option of the company, usually at a slight premium to par. (To learn more, read Callable Bonds: Leading A Double Life.)
2. Risks of Bonds
Credit/Default Risk
Credit or default risk is the risk that interest and principal payments due on the obligation will not be made as required. (To learn more, read Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk.)
Prepayment Risk
Prepayment risk is the risk that a given bond issue will be paid off earlier than expected, normally through a call provision. This can be bad news for investors, because the company only has an incentive to repay the obligation early when interest rates have declined substantially. Instead of continuing to hold a high interest investment, investors are left to reinvest funds in a lower interest rate environment.
Interest Rate Risk
Interest rate risk is the risk that interest rates will change significantly from what the investor expected. If interest rates significantly decline, the investor faces the possibility of prepayment. If interest rates increase, the investor will be stuck with an instrument yielding below market rates. The greater the time to maturity, the greater the interest rate risk an investor bears, because it is harder to predict market developments farther out into the future. (To learn more, readManaging Interest Rate Risk.)
3. Bond Ratings

Agencies
The most commonly cited bond rating agencies are Standard & Poor'sMoody'sand Fitch. These agencies rate a company's ability to repay its obligations. Ratings range from 'AAA' to 'Aaa' for "high grade" issues very likely to be repaid to 'D' for issues that are in currently in default. Bonds rated 'BBB' to 'Baa' or above are called "investment grade"; this means that they are unlikely to default and tend to remain stable investments. Bonds rated 'BB' to 'Ba' or below are called "junk bonds", which means that default is more likely, and they are thus more speculative and subject to price volatility.
Occasionally, firms will not have their bonds rated, in which case it is solely up to the investor to judge a firm's repayment ability. Because the ratings systems differ for each agency and change from time to time, it is prudent to research the rating definition for the bond issue you are considering. (To learn more, read The Debt Ratings Debate.)
4. Bond Yields
Bond yields are all measures of return. Yield to maturity is the measurement most often used, but it is important to understand several other yield measurements that are used in certain situations.
Yield to Maturity (YTM)
As said above, yield to maturity (YTM) is the most commonly cited yield measurement. It measures what the return on a bond is if it is held to maturity and all coupons are reinvested at the YTM rate. Because it is unlikely that coupons will be reinvested at the same rate, an investor's actual return will differ slightly. Calculating YTM by hand is a lengthy procedure, so it is best to use Excel's RATE or YIELDMAT (Excel 2007 only) functions for this computation. A simple function is also available on a financial calculator. (Keep reading on this subject in Microsoft Excel Features For The Financially Literate.)
Current Yield
Current yield can be used to compare the interest income provided by a bond to the dividend income provided by a stock. This is calculated by dividing the bond's annual coupon amount by the bond's current price. Keep in mind that this yield incorporates only the income portion of return, ignoring possible capital gains or losses. As such, this yield is most useful for investors concerned with current income only.
Nominal Yield
The nominal yield on a bond is simply the percentage of interest to be paid on the bond periodically. It is calculated by dividing the annual coupon payment by the par value of the bond. It is important to note that the nominal yield does not estimate return accurately unless the current bond price is the same as its par value. Therefore, nominal yield is used only for calculating other measures of return.
Yield to Call (YTC)
A callable bond always bears some probability of being called before the maturity date. Investors will realize a slightly higher yield if the called bonds are paid off at a premium. An investor in such a bond may wish to know what yield will be realized if the bond is called at a particular call date, to determine whether the prepayment risk is worthwhile. It is easiest to calculate this yield using Excel's YIELD or IRR functions, or with a financial calculator. (For more insight, see Callable Bonds: Leading A Double Life.)
Realized Yield
The realized yield of a bond should be calculated if an investor plans to hold a bond only for a certain period of time, rather than to maturity. In this case, the investor will sell the bond, and this projected future bond price must be estimated for the calculation. Because future prices are hard to predict, this yield measurement is only an estimation of return. This yield calculation is best performed using Excel's YIELD or IRR functions, or by using a financial calculator.
Conclusion 
Although the bond market appears complex, it is really driven by the same risk/return tradeoffs as the stock market. An investor need only master these few basic terms and measurements to unmask the familiar market dynamics and become a competent bond investor. Once you've gotten a hang of the lingo, the rest is easy.
Debenture
Any debt obligation backed strictly by the borrower's integrity, e.g. an unsecured bond. A debenture is documented in an indenture.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.
Debenture
debt securityissued by a government or large company, that is not secured by an asset or lien, but rather by the all issuer's assets nototherwise secured. That is, a debenture carries no collateral and is considered unsecured; in case of bankruptcy, the debenture holder isconsidered a general creditor. A debenture can be traded, and the term is often interchangeable with a bond. Debentures issued bygovernments are considered risk-free. See also: Treasury security.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
debenture
A corporate bond that is not secured by specific property. In the event that the issuer is liquidated, the holder of a debenture becomes ageneral creditor and therefore is less likely than the secured creditors to recover in full. Because of their high risk factor, debentures payhigher rates of interest than secured debt of the same issuer. See also subordinated debenture.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Debenture.
A debenture is an unsecured bond. Most bonds issued by corporations are debentures, which are backed by their reputation rather than byany collateral, such as the company's buildings or its inventory.
Although debentures sound riskier than secured bonds, they aren't when they're issued by well-established companies with good creditratings.
Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
debenture
An unsecured note or bond.
The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Debenture
What Does Debenture Mean?
A debt instrument that is not secured by a physical asset or collateral. Debentures are backed only by the general creditworthiness andreputation of the issuer. Both corporations and governments frequently issue this type of bond to secure capital. Like other types of bonds,debentures are documented in an indenture.
Investopedia explains Debenture
Debentures have no collateral. Bond buyers generally purchase debentures when they believe that the bond issuer is unlikely to default onthe repayment. An example of a government debenture would be any government-issued Treasury bond (T-bond) or Treasury bill (T-bill);these generally are considered risk-free because governments, at worst, can print more money or raise taxes to pay these types of debts.
Related Terms: 
DEFINITION OF 'CAPITAL MARKETS'
Markets for buying and selling equity and debt instruments. Capital markets channel savings and investment between suppliers of capital such as retail investors and institutional investors, and users of capital like businesses, government and individuals. Capital markets are vital to the functioning of an economy, since capital is a critical component for generating economic output. Capital markets include primary markets, where new stock and bond issues are sold to investors, and secondary markets, which trade existing securities. 
INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'CAPITAL MARKETS'
Capital markets typically involve issuing instruments such as stocks and bonds for the medium-term and long-term. In this respect, capital markets are distinct from money markets, which refer to markets for financial instruments with maturities not exceeding one year.
Capital markets have numerous participants including individual investors, institutional investors such as pension funds and mutual funds, municipalities and governments, companies and organizations and banks and financial institutions. Suppliers of capital generally want the maximum possible return at the lowest possible risk, while users of capital want to raise capital at the lowest possible cost.
The size of a nation’s capital markets is directly proportional to the size of its economy. The United States, the world’s largest economy, has the biggest and deepest capital markets. Capital markets are increasingly interconnected in a globalized economy, which means that ripples in one corner can cause major waves elsewhere. The drawback of this interconnection is best illustrated by the global credit crisis of 2007-09, which was triggered by the collapse in U.S. mortgage-backed securities. The effects of this meltdown were globally transmitted by capital markets since banks and institutions in Europe and Asia held trillions of dollars of these securities.
ne of the sections of a financial market where securities and financial instruments with short-term maturities are traded is called the money market.

Definition: One of the sections of a financial market where securities and financial instruments with short-term maturities are traded is called the money market. Financial assets like treasury bills, certificates of deposits, commercial paper and bankers' acceptance are some of the short-term debt securities traded in the money market.

Description: The instruments traded in the money market have a short-term maturity period ranging from 30 days to a year. Hence this market is the best source to invest in liquid assets.

The only demerit accompanying the money market is the disorganization. Unlike organized markets, e.g. capital markets, the money market is unregulated and informal. In addition, this market gives lesser returns to the investor. However, the money market is regarded as safe.


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/definition/money-market
Shares, Bonds, Debentures, capital market, money market -- defnititons Reviewed by sambasivan srinivasan on 3:29:00 PM Rating: 5

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